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Idea Generation

Josh Reich: People Say They Need Complexity, But What They Want Is Simplicity


About this presentation

Josh Reich hated his bank. He was tired of overdraft fees and being treated like a number. So he made his own. 

Starting in a basement in Brooklyn and eventually growing to a full-fledged an office in Portland, Oregon, Simple is now a fast-growing startup aiming to replace our modern notion of the bank with a focus on design and user experience. In this talk, Reich walks us through Simple’s ever-evolving “human oriented” design process that forgoes a design department. Instead, every employee is given the agency to create.

About Josh Reich

Josh’s career has spanned marketing analytics and quantitative finance, including running a data mining consulting firm, a quantitative strategy group at a $10b fund, and core components at the mortgage lead market, Root Exchange. Three years ago, Josh founded Simple, formerly BankSimple, a company that is working to radically redesign banking by using modern technology to help people worry less about money. Josh has a BSc. in mathematics and statistics from the University of Melbourne, most of a medical degree, and an MBA from Carnegie Mellon University.

Links

Simple 
Twitter

Comments (1)
  • Karen Johnston

    This banking idea is wonderful. Your efforts somehow make me happy to be alive again – that all is possible gain. Thank you for these efforts.

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